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Sunday, December 28, 2014

Goya: Order and Disorder-2015





Goya: Order and Disorder

Francisco Goya-1746-1828

Museum of Fine Arts--Boston
Exhibition of 170 paintings, prints, and drawings--October 12-January 19, 2015





Self-Portrait While Painting




Don Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuniga




 Duchess of Alba




Maria Luisa de Borbon y Vallabriga 




 Maria Teresa de Borbon y Vallabriga




 Straw Mannequin




 The Parasol




The Last Communion of St. Joseph of Calasanz




 Self-Portrait





Self-Portrait with Dr. Arrieta 

                             

Review from Art Daily--Click here:

For review by Chris Bergeron of the Metrowest Daily News Click here

Review by Sebastian Smee for the the Boston Globe
Click here:

New York Times review by Holland Cotter
Click here:

Boston Magazine review by Olga Khvan
 Click here:

Providence Journal by Bill Van Siclen
Click here

Commentary from WBUR-Boston's NPR  
Click here

*** Confronting the unthinkable in Goya's Art
by Sebastian Smee--Boston Globe Staff-January 10, 2015
Click here

A reader's comment in response to the above article:
 

dtc4801/11/15 09:03 AM

"The MFA show portrayed so much more than the typical Goya portraits and religious scenes. The portrayal of war was clearly disquieting. The Seated Giant took on a new meaning for me after studying the “Disasters of War” and “Caprichos” etchings. The second time through the show I hardly stopped in the large room with all the portraits, but lingered in the last two rooms where I got a new understanding of the depth of Goya's thinking about the tragedy of war and especially of the Peninsular War. As spectacular as the portraits and the Last Communion of Saint Joseph of Calasanz are, the depiction of war and violence are what will stay with me.

Thanks to the MFA for a great show and to Mr. Smee for his usual insights."


1 comment:

  1. Francisco Goya is widely celebrated as the most important Spanish artist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the last of the Old Masters and the first of the Moderns. MFA

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